Donizetti: Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal

£3.00 - £37.50 £1.50 - £37.50

3 disc set
Single Track Download

Few figures in European history fire the imagination more than Don Sebastian of Portugal.

Clear
Catalogue Number: ORC33 Categories: ,
  1. Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act I: Prélude Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  2. Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act I scène I: Introduction: Nautonniers, mettez à la voile! Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  3. Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act I scène I: Introduction: Ainsi nous l'emportons Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  4. Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act I scène II: Air: Encore ce soldat, qui me poursuit sans cesse - scène III: Eh! pourquoi Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  5. Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act I scène III: Air: Soldat, j'ai rêvé la victoire Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  6. Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act I scène III: Finale: Regarde! - scène IV: Ah! qu'est-ce que je vois? Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  7. Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act I scène IV: Finale: Quelle est-elle? Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  8. Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act I scène IV: Finale: O mon Dieu, sur la terre Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  9. Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act I scène IV: Finale: Entendez-vous la trompette Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  10. Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act I scène IV: Finale: Oui, le ciel m'enflamme et m'inspire! Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  11. Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act I scène IV: Finale: Entendez-vous la trompette Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  12. Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act II scène I: Les délices de nos campagnes Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  13. Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act II scène II: Romance: Que faire? Où cacher ma tristesse? Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  14. Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act II scène III: Eh quoi? Ton front toujours voilé par un nuage Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  15. Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act II scène III: Ballet Music: Pas de Trois Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  16. Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act II scène III: Ballet Music: Pas de deux Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  17. Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act II scène III: Ballet Music: Danse finale Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  18. Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act II scène IV: Finale: Eh quoi? des danses et des fêtes! ... Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  19. Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act II scène V: Finale: Une épée! ...une épée! Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  20. Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act II scène VI: Finale: Victoire! victoire! victoire! Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  21. Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act II scène VII: Finale: Il est tombé! Parmi ces cadavres Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  22. Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act II scène VII: Finale: Grand Dieu! Sa misère est si grande Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  23. Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act II scène VII: Finale: Vouloir sauver mes jours, c'est exposer les tiens Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  24. Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act II scène VII: Finale: Courage! ... ô mon roi! Courage... Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  25. Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act II scène VIII: Finale: Du sang! du sang! Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  26. Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act II scène VIII: Finale: Eh bien donc! ... Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  27. Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act II scène VIII: Finale: Seul sur la terre Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  28. Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act III scène I: Recitative: Pour éteindre une guerre aux deux pays cruels - scène II: Nous sommes seuls! Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  29. Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act III scène II: Duet: C'est qu'en tous lieux Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  30. Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act III scène III: Recitative: Sur le sable d'Afrique Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  31. Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act III scène IV: Romance: Qui vive! ? - scène V: O noble Sebastien! Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  32. Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act III scène VI: Finale: C'est un soldat qui revient de la guerre Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  33. Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act III scène VI: Finale: Requiem - scène VII: Requiem eternam Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  34. Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act III scène VII: Finale: D'un monarque imprudent oublions la folie Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  35. Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act III scène VII: Finale: Misérable qui arrive Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  36. Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act IV scène I: O voûtes souterraines! Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  37. Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act IV scène II: Finale: Toi qui, par un mensonge impie Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  38. Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act IV scène III: Finale: Grand Dieu! Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  39. Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act IV scène III: Finale: D'espoir et de terreur Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  40. Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act IV scène III: Finale: Arrête ... Des serments que le Ciel a maudits Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  41. Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act IV scène III: Finale: Va, parjure! épouse impie Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  42. Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act IV scène III: Finale: Ah! Zayda! Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  43. Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act V scène I: Duet: Ainsi les Espagnols s'avancent? Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  44. Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act V scène II: Duet: Tes jours et ceux de ton complice Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  45. Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act V scène III: Duet: La mort! Ce mot naguère Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  46. Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act V scène IV: Duet: Zayda! Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  47. Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act V scène IV: Duet: Son âme noble et fière Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  48. Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act V scène IV: Duet: Entends-tu, Zayda, sonner la dixième heure! Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  49. Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act V scène IV: Duet: Sans regret, sans remord Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  50. Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act V scène IV: Barcarolle: O matelots, ô matelots ... Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  51. Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act V scène IV: Barcarolle: Camoëns! Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  52. Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act V scène VI: Finale: A moitié du chemin ces remparts sont placés ... Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34

Description

Few figures in European history fire the imagination more than Don Sebastian of Portugal. Romantic literature spun extravagant tales around him, and in 1843 he became the subject of Donizetti’s last-composed opera, a sombre five-act masterpiece given at the Paris Opéra. The sheer logistics of staging such a work have militated against its wide performance, but we are convinced that this new recording will trigger a new recognition of its value. Sung in French, the set includes at 220-page booklet with detailed article on the opera by Jeremy Commons and English libretto translation.

Booklet includes complete libretto with English translation.

‘One of the most important Donizetti releases of recent years’ – George Hall, Opera Now

Cast

Vesselina Kasarova (Zayda), Giuseppe Filianoti (Dom Sébastien), Alastair Miles (Dom Juam de Sylva), Simon Keenlyside (Abayaldos), Carmelo Corrado Caruso (Camoëns), Roberto Gleadow (Dom Henrique), John Upperton (Dom Antonio/First Inquisitor), Lee Hickenbottom (Second Inquisitor), Andrew Slater (Den-Sélim), Martyn Hill (Dom Luis), Nigel Cliffe (Soldier), John Bernays (Third Inquisitor), The Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, Mark Elder – conductor

Tracklist

01 Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act I: Prélude
02 Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act I scène I: Introduction: Nautonniers, mettez à la voile!
03 Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act I scène I: Introduction: Ainsi nous l’emportons
04 Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act I scène II: Air: Encore ce soldat, qui me poursuit sans cesse – scène III: Eh! pourquoi
05 Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act I scène III: Air: Soldat, j’ai rêvé la victoire
06 Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act I scène III: Finale: Regarde! – scène IV: Ah! qu’est-ce que je vois?
07 Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act I scène IV: Finale: Quelle est-elle?
08 Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act I scène IV: Finale: O mon Dieu, sur la terre
09 Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act I scène IV: Finale: Entendez-vous la trompette
10 Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act I scène IV: Finale: Oui, le ciel m’enflamme et m’inspire!
11 Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act I scène IV: Finale: Entendez-vous la trompette
12 Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act II scène I: Les délices de nos campagnes
13 Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act II scène II: Romance: Que faire? Où cacher ma tristesse?
14 Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act II scène III: Eh quoi? Ton front toujours voilé par un nuage
15 Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act II scène III: Ballet Music: Pas de Trois
16 Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act II scène III: Ballet Music: Pas de deux
17 Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act II scène III: Ballet Music: Danse finale
18 Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act II scène IV: Finale: Eh quoi? des danses et des fêtes! …
19 Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act II scène V: Finale: Une épée! …une épée!
20 Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act II scène VI: Finale: Victoire! victoire! victoire!
21 Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act II scène VII: Finale: Il est tombé! Parmi ces cadavres
22 Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act II scène VII: Finale: Grand Dieu! Sa misère est si grande
23 Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act II scène VII: Finale: Vouloir sauver mes jours, c’est exposer les tiens
24 Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act II scène VII: Finale: Courage! … ô mon roi! Courage…
25 Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act II scène VIII: Finale: Du sang! du sang!
26 Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act II scène VIII: Finale: Eh bien donc! …
27 Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act II scène VIII: Finale: Seul sur la terre
28 Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act III scène I: Recitative: Pour éteindre une guerre aux deux pays cruels – scène II: Nous sommes seuls!
29 Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act III scène II: Duet: C’est qu’en tous lieux
30 Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act III scène III: Recitative: Sur le sable d’Afrique
31 Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act III scène IV: Romance: Qui vive! ? – scène V: O noble Sebastien!
32 Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act III scène VI: Finale: C’est un soldat qui revient de la guerre
33 Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act III scène VI: Finale: Requiem – scène VII: Requiem eternam
34 Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act III scène VII: Finale: D’un monarque imprudent oublions la folie
35 Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act III scène VII: Finale: Misérable qui arrive
36 Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act IV scène I: O voûtes souterraines!
37 Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act IV scène II: Finale: Toi qui, par un mensonge impie
38 Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act IV scène III: Finale: Grand Dieu!
39 Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act IV scène III: Finale: D’espoir et de terreur
40 Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act IV scène III: Finale: Arrête … Des serments que le Ciel a maudits
41 Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act IV scène III: Finale: Va, parjure! épouse impie
42 Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act IV scène III: Finale: Ah! Zayda!
43 Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act V scène I: Duet: Ainsi les Espagnols s’avancent?
44 Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act V scène II: Duet: Tes jours et ceux de ton complice
45 Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act V scène III: Duet: La mort! Ce mot naguère
46 Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act V scène IV: Duet: Zayda!
47 Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act V scène IV: Duet: Son âme noble et fière
48 Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act V scène IV: Duet: Entends-tu, Zayda, sonner la dixième heure!
49 Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act V scène IV: Duet: Sans regret, sans remord
50 Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act V scène IV: Barcarolle: O matelots, ô matelots …
51 Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act V scène IV: Barcarolle: Camoëns!
52 Dom Sébastien, roi de Portugal: Act V scène VI: Finale: A moitié du chemin ces remparts sont placés …

English

Act 1.

While sailors at the port of Lisbon make final preparations for the embarkation of Dom Sébastien and his forces on their way to North Africa, we learn that not everyone in the kingdom supports the expedition. Dom Antonio, Sébastien’s uncle who is to rule as regent in his absence, rejoices at the prospect of being rid of his nephew and seizing his power, which he intends to share with Dom Juam de Sylva, the Grand Inquisitor. Don Juam, however, has his own agenda: in return for a guarantee of continuing favour, he has every intention of selling Portugal to Philip II of Spain.

Dom Antonio is pestered by a down-at-heel old soldier who wishes to speak to the King. He tries to turn him away, but Sébastien, who appears at this moment, is indignant that one of his followers should be denied access to him. The soldier, who reveals himself as the poet Camoëns, asks to be allowed to accompany the expedition to Africa. Sébastien acquiesces, but Camoëns then craves another boon. He draws the King’s attention to a procession of Inquisitors who are leading one of their victims, a young woman, to execution. This is Zayda, a Moroccan who, captured and converted to Christianity, has been overcome by homesickness and apprehended as she tried to escape and return to her homeland. Sébastien takes pity on her, but earns the resentment of the clerics when he commutes her sentence to perpetual exile – in Morocco in the house of her father.

Turning his attention to the imminent embarkation, he asks Camoëns to extemporise a poem of departure. Camoëns prophetically foresees that the army will have to face vastly superior forces, but urges the Portuguese to press forward undaunted. At this moment the sky grows dark with threatening storm, and Camoëns, in sympathetic response, finds himself foretelling the rout of the Portuguese army: his cry to the soldiers is now to rescue their King. Sébastien, alarmed at the direction the song is taking, intervenes, and Camoëns, as the sky returns to serenity, bids all incline their flags before the sun which will surely shine upon their deeds. All pray for the success of the expedition – all except Don Juam, whose words are ambiguous (‘May Providence deign to grant my wishes’), Dom Antonio, who secretly hopes the expedition may never return, and the Inquisitors, who call down anathema upon a king who braves their authority. Sébastien and his followers embark.

Act 2.

Scene 1. In the home of her father, Ben-Selim, the Governor of Fez, Zayda is fêted by her female companions, who look forward to her expected marriage to the Arab chief Abayaldos. She herself, however, remains pensive and sad, for she has lost her heart to Sébastien.

Ben-Selim has organised dances to divert her, but Abayaldos bursts in, angry that they should waste their time on frivolity when Morocco is invaded by foreigners. All the men respond to his call to arms, and seize their swords. Abayaldos urges Zayda to promise him her heart as his prize for his prowess in the forthcoming battle, but she – understandably in view of her feelings for Sébastien – is unable to respond as he wishes.

Scene 2. The plain of Alcazar-Kebir, following the defeat of the Portuguese. Dom Sébastien is surrounded by a number of his officers. All are wounded. A hoard of Arabs erupts on to the stage, seeking the king, and one of the officers, the dying Dom Henrique de Sandoval, saves Sebastien’s life by claiming that he himself is the man they seek. The Portuguese – all but Sébastien, who has fainted from loss of blood – are led away captive.

Zayda enters furtively. Finding Sébastien still alive, she revives him and binds up his wounds, declaring that she loves him and will devote herself to him for the rest of her life. He, for his part, recognises her as an angel sent to him by Heaven.

At this point Abayaldos and the Arabs return, still intent upon blood. Zayda, without revealing Sébastien’s identity, pleads for his life. She tells how, when her own life was saved in Lisbon, she vowed that she would reciprocate by seeking and seizing the opportunity of saving a Portuguese. Abayaldos bargains with her, agreeing to grant her plea if – but only if – she consents to marry him. Having no alternative, she succumbs to his demand and allows herself to be led away.

Sébastien, left alone, laments his fate. He recognises Zayda’s devotion as his only consolation.

Act 3.

Scene 1. In the royal palace of Lisbon, Dom Antonio, now effectively king, receives the Moroccan ambassador, who is none other than Abayaldos. As yet no one realises that the wife whom Abayaldos has obliged to come with him is Zayda.

When husband and wife find themselves alone, we discover the hollowness of their marriage. Abayaldos believes himself unloved and betrayed in thought if not in deed. The only reason he has brought Zayda to Lisbon is that he is too jealous to let her out of his sight. She, for her part, declares that he is welcome to kill her, but she reserves her right to hate him.

Scene 2.

The great square before the Cathedral of Lisbon, by night. A wounded Camoëns appears, mortified to think that he returns to his homeland penniless, and obliged to resort to begging in order to survive. A detachment of soldiers passes, going their rounds, and one of them, hearing that he comes from Africa, warns him not to publicise the fact: the new king, Antonio, has no sympathy for his predecessor’s adherents.

By coincidence the first person of whom Camoëns asks alms turns out to be Dom Sébastien, returned to Lisbon in not much better shape. They greet each other warmly, but are interrupted by the mournful sounds of an approaching funeral procession. To his amazement, Sébastien realises that it is for himself: an ostentatious mock funeral mounted by his uncle, Dom Antonio. This is too much for Camoëns, who protests that anyone should so outrage the true king. Dom Juam de Sylva tries to quell the disturbance and have Camoëns arrested, but Sébastien steps forward to his defence. All are astonished to recognise him, but Abayaldos, who happens to be among the onlookers and who realises that this is the same man whose life he spared, declares that he buried the true king at Alcazar-Kebir. Dom Juam de Sylva, recovering from his shock, denounces Sébastien as an impostor. Threatening him with all the wrath of the Inquisition, he has him arrested, and as the procession resumes its course, Sébastien is dragged away. An exhausted Camoëns falls unconscious in the arms of bystanders.

Act 4.

A subterranean hall of the Inquisition. After the officers of the Inquisition have assembled, Dom Sébastien is led in. When questioned by Dom Juam, he refuses to acknowledge the right of the Inquisitors to try him, and declines to be interrogated further.

Dom Juam announces that a witness waits to be heard, and Zayda appears. She declares that the man who died at Alcazar-Kebir was Dom Henrique, and that Sébastien was in fact saved by a woman – herself. Recognising her, Dom Juam denounces her as the apostate who, as a result of Sébastien’s intervention, had escaped from the Inquisition when on her way to the pyre. Any remote chance she may have had of influencing the trial in Sébastien’s favour rapidly evaporates, and is utterly destroyed when Abayaldos, who has been lurking in the background, steps forward and brands her as an adulteress. She interprets this as a sign that she is now released from any remnant of obligation to him, and proudly and defiantly acknowledges her love for Sébastien. Dom Juam has her arrested, determined that both she and Sébastien shall die, and they are haled away in different directions.

Act 5.

In a tower adjoining the prisons of the Inquisition, Dom Juam de Sylva, in conversation with Dom Luis, the Spanish envoy, concludes his traitorous pact to sell Portugal into the hands of Philip II. He then has Zayda brought in, and informs her that he is willing to spare Sébastien if she can persuade him to sign a document he has prepared. Zayda is only too willing to snatch at any chance of saving Sébastien’s life, and undertakes to gain his signature. Dom Juam gives her an hour in which to do so: if she does not succeed, she will die.

Left alone, Zayda finds that the prospect of death no longer daunts her. On the other hand, if she could be the means of saving Sébastien’s life, that would be happiness indeed. Sébastien soon joins her. They greet each other warmly, and eagerly open the document. But it turns out to be a pact that, provided he renounces his crown and his rights, he should be handed over to Spain. He declares that he could never sign anything so ignominious and shameful. Zayda agrees, and as a clock is heard striking the hour, she prepares to die.

The Inquisitors enter. Sébastien, comprehending the situation, immediately changes his mind and determines to sign. It is now Zayda’s turn to protest: if he does so, she will throw herself into the sea and drown. He nevertheless goes ahead and hands the document, duly endorsed, to the Inquisitors.

As the Inquisitors retire, Zayda goes to carry out her threat. But from below there come the sounds of a barcarolle, and a moment later Camoëns appears. He has a barque waiting for them at the foot of the tower, and carries with him a rope ladder to enable them to descend.

Scene 2.

The set changes to show the exterior of the tower with the sea below. Zayda and Camoëns have already descended in safety to a bastion halfway down, and there Sébastien joins them. At the same time Dom Antonio and Abayaldos appear beneath the tower, Abayaldos alarmed that the prisoners should be escaping, but Antonio coldly declaring that this is all part of a deliberate plan. As Zayda and Sébastien resume their descent, soldiers appear at the top of the tower and slash away the rope ladder, so precipitating the lovers to their deaths in the sea. The soldiers now fire upon Camoëns, who, wounded, falls after them. A gloating Antonio declares himself king, but Dom Juam de Sylva, appearing at this moment, disillusions him, showing the paper, signed by Sébastien, which cedes the kingdom to Spain. Camoëns, dying, is carried in by a group of sailors, and continues to call upon Sébastien even while Dom Juam proclaims Philip II king. In the distance the Spanish fleet is seen approaching.

German

1. Akt

Während Matrosen im Hafen von Lissabon letzte Vorbereitungen treffen, ehe sich Dom Sébastien und seine Truppen nach Nordafrika einschiffen, erfahren wir, dass nicht das ganze Königreich diesen Feldzug unterstützt. Dom Antonio, Sébastiens Onkel, der während dessen Abwesenheit die Regentschaft übernehmen soll, frohlockt ob der Aussicht, seines Neffen entledigt zu sein und die Macht an sich reißen zu können, die er mit Dom Juam de Sylva, dem Großinquisitor, teilen möchte. Don Juam verfolgt jedoch eigene Ziele: Im Gegenzug für die Zusicherung weiterer Gunsten will er Portugal an Philipp II. von Spanien verkaufen.

Ein verarmter alter Soldat bedrängt Dom Antonio mit der Bitte, den König zu sprechen. Sébastiens Onkel will ihn fortschicken, doch in dem Moment erscheint der König selbst und empört sich, dass einem seiner Gefolgsleute der Zutritt zu ihm verwehrt wird. Der Soldat, der sich als der Dichter Camoëns vorstellt, bittet um Erlaubnis, am Feldzug in Nordafrika teilzunehmen. Kaum hat Sébastien ihm seinen Wunsch gewährt, trägt Camoëns ein weiteres Anliegen vor: Er macht den König auf eine Prozession von Inquisitoren aufmerksam, die eine junge Frau zu ihrer Hinrichtung führen. Bei der Verurteilten handelt es sich um Zayda, eine junge Marokkanerin, die gefangen genommen und zum Christentum bekehrt wurde und hier in Portugal von Heimweh übermannt wurde. Beim Versuch, zu fliehen und nach Marokko zurückzukehren, wurde sie gefasst. Sébastien erbarmt sich ihrer und wandelt das Urteil zu lebenslangem Exil ab – im Haus ihres Vaters in Marokko. Damit zieht er allerdings den Zorn der Geistlichen auf sich.

Dann wendet er seine Aufmerksamkeit der bevorstehenden Einschiffung zu und bittet Camoëns, aus dem Stegreif ein Abschiedsgedicht vorzutragen. Der Poet prophezeit, dass die Truppen sich einer immensen Übermacht werden stellen müssen, drängt die Portugiesen aber, furchtlos nach Afrika zu ziehen. In diesem Augenblick erscheinen dunkel drohende Sturmwolken am Himmel. Als Reaktion darauf sagt Camoëns eine Niederlage der portugiesischen Armee voraus und beschwört die Soldaten, ihren König zu retten. Erschrocken über die Wendung, die das Gedicht nimmt, unterbricht Sébastien ihn, und unter dem nun wieder heiteren Himmel bittet der Dichter die Versammelten, ihre Fahnen vor der Sonne zu senken, die sicherlich ihre Mission begleiten werde. Alle beten um den Erfolg des Feldzugs – bis auf Dom Juam, dessen Worte höchst zweideutig sind („Möge die Vorsehung mir meine Wünsche gewähren“), Dom Antonio, der insgeheim hofft, die Armee möge nie wiederkehren, und die Inquisitoren, die den König verfluchen, weil er sich ihrer Autorität widersetzt hat. Sébastien und seine Gefolgsleute gehen an Bord.

2. Akt

1. Szene Im Haus ihres Vaters Ben-Selim, dem Gouverneur von Fez, nimmt Zayda die Glückwünsche ihrer Gefährtinnen entgegen, die sich über ihre Hochzeit mit dem arabischen Häuptling Abayaldos freuen. Zayda selbst jedoch ist nachdenklich und traurig, denn sie hat ihr Herz an Sébastien verloren.

Zur Zerstreuung seiner Tochter lässt Ben-Selim Tänze aufführen, bis Abayaldos hereinstürzt und sich erbost, dass die Gäste ihre Zeit mit Lustbarkeiten vergeuden, während Fremde in Marokko eindringen. Alle Männer folgen seinem Ruf zu den Waffen und greifen nach ihrem Schwert. Abayaldos bittet Zayda, ihm ihr Herz zu versprechen als Lohn für seinen Sieg in der bevorstehenden Schlacht, doch sie kann ihm – angesichts ihrer Gefühle für Sébastien verständlicherweise – seinen Wunsch nicht erfüllen.

2. Szene Die Ebene von Alcazar-Kebir, nach der Niederlage der Portugiesen. Dom Sébastien steht im Kreis seiner Offiziere, alle sind verwundet. Eine Gruppe Araber stürmt herbei auf der Suche nach dem König. Einer der Offiziere, der sterbende Dom Henrique de Sandoval, gibt sich als der Gesuchte aus und rettet Sébastien damit das Leben. Die Portugiesen werden – bis auf Sébastien, der wegen seines großen Blutverlusts das Bewusstsein verloren hat – als Gefangene abgeführt.

Verstohlen tritt Zayda auf. Als sie feststellt, dass Sébastien noch am Leben ist, bringt sie ihn wieder zum Bewusstsein, behandelt seine Wunden und erklärt ihm, dass sie ihn liebt und ihm den Rest ihres Lebens treu dienen wird. Er seinerseits sieht sie als seinen vom Himmel gesandten Engel.

In dem Augenblick kehren Abayaldos und die Araber zurück, ihr Blutdurst ist noch nicht gestillt. Ohne Sébastiens Identität preiszugeben, bittet Zayda um sein Leben. Sie erklärt, dass sie in Lissabon gelobte, das Leben eines Portugiesen zu retten zum Dank dafür, dass ihr dort das Leben geschenkt wurde. Abayaldos feilscht mit ihr und willigt schließlich in ihr Ansinnen ein unter der Bedingung, dass sie seine Frau wird. Da ihr keine andere Wahl bleibt, fügt sie sich seinem Willen und lässt sich fortführen.

Allein gelassen, beklagt Sébastien sein Los; Zaydas Liebe ist für ihn der einzige Trost, der ihm geblieben ist.

3. Akt

1. Szene Im Königspalast in Lissabon empfängt Dom Antonio, der nun als König herrscht, den marokkanischen Gesandten, der kein anderer ist als Abayaldos. Niemand weiß, dass es sich bei der Gemahlin, die er mitzukommen gezwungen hat, um Zayda handelt.

Als das Paar allein ist, zeigt sich die Hohlheit ihrer Ehe. Abayaldos fühlt sich ungeliebt und betrogen, wenn nicht in Taten, so doch in Gedanken. Er hat Zayda nur deshalb nach Lissabon mitgenommen, weil er sie in seiner Eifersucht nicht aus den Augen lassen will. Sie ihrerseits erklärt, dass er sie jederzeit töten könne, doch sie nehme sich das Recht heraus, ihn zu hassen.

2. Szene Nachts. Der große Platz vor der Kathedrale in Lissabon. Camoëns tritt verletzt auf; ihn quält der Gedanke, dass er völlig mittellos in die Heimat zurückgekehrt und zum Überleben aufs Betteln angewiesen ist. Eine Abordnung Soldaten kommt auf ihrer Patrouille an ihm vorbei, und als einer der Männer hört, dass er gerade aus Afrika zurückgekehrt ist, warnt er ihn, diesen Umstand nicht allzu laut zu verkünden: Der neue König Antonio habe nichts für die Gefolgsleute seines Vorgängers übrig.

Zufällig ist der erste Mensch, den Camoëns um Almosen bittet, Dom Sébastien; er ist in ähnlich erbärmlichen Zustand nach Lissabon zurückgekehrt. Sie begrüßen sich herzlich, doch ihr Gespräch wird von den Klagelauten einer Trauerprozession unterbrochen. Zu Sébastiens Überraschung muss er feststellen, dass die Prozession ihm zu Ehren abgehalten wird – eine prachtvolle Schein-Beerdigung, die sein Onkel Dom Antonio veranstaltet. Dies erbittert Camoëns, der sich lauthals dagegen verwahrt, dass der wahre König derart beleidigt wird. Um die Ordnung wiederherzustellen, will Dom Juam de Sylva Camoëns kurzerhand verhaften, doch da tritt Sébastien zu seiner Verteidigung vor. Alle sind erstaunt, als sie ihn erkennen, aber Abayaldos, der zufällig unter den Schaulustigen steht und den Mann als eben jenen erkennt, dem er das Leben schenkte, erklärt, dass er den wahren König in Alcazar-Kebir bestattet habe. Sobald Dom Juam de Sylva sich von seinem Schock erholt hat, prangt er Sébastien als Betrüger an. Er droht ihm mit der gesamten Macht der Inquisition, lässt ihn verhaften, und während die Prozession ihren Weg wieder aufnimmt, wird Sébastien fortgeschleppt. Camoëns fällt vor ohnmächtiger Erschöpfung in die Arme der Umstehenden.

4. Akt

Ein unterirdischer Saal der Inquisition. Nachdem sich die Inquisitoren versammelt haben, wird Dom Sébastien hereingeführt. Auf eine Frage Dom Juams hin spricht er der Inquisition das Recht ab, ihm den Prozess zu machen, und verweigert sich jedem weiteren Verhör.

Dom Juam verkündet, dass eine Zeugin gehört werden möchte, und Zayda tritt auf. Sie erklärt, dass es sich bei dem in Alcazar-Kebir Verstorbenen um Dom Henrique handelte und dass Sébastiens Leben von einer Frau gerettet wurde – ihr selbst. Dom Juam erkennt sie und brandmarkt sie als die Abtrünnige, die als Folge von Sébastiens Eingreifen der Inquisition auf dem Weg zum Scheiterhaufen entrissen wurde. Jede noch so geringe Hoffnung, das Verfahren zu Sébastiens Gunsten zu beeinflussen, zerschlägt sich, als Abayaldos aus dem Hintergrund vortritt und Zayda des Ehebruchs bezichtigt. Nun sieht Zayda sich jeder Verpflichtung ihrem Ehemann gegenüber entbunden und bekennt sich stolz und trotzig zu ihrer Liebe zu Sébastien. Dom Juam lässt sie ebenfalls festnehmen, um sie und Sébastien zum Tod zu verurteilen, und sie werden in unterschiedliche Richtungen abgeführt.

5. Akt

In einem Turm neben dem Kerker der Inquisition schließt Dom Juam de Sylva im Gespräch mit Dom Luis, dem spanischen Abgesandten, seinen verräterischen Pakt ab, Portugal an Philipp II. zu verkaufen. Dann lässt er Zayda hereinführen und erklärt ihr, er sei bereit, Sébastien zu verschonen, wenn sie ihn dazu überreden könne, das von ihm vorbereitete Dokument zu unterzeichnen. Entschlossen, Sébastiens Leben um jeden Preis zu retten, verpflichtet Zayda sich, seine Unterschrift zu gewinnen. Dom Juam gibt ihr für diese Aufgabe eine Stunde Zeit – sollte sie erfolglos sein, müsse sie sterben.

Allein gelassen stellt Zayda fest, dass der Tod für sie jeden Schrecken verloren hat. Könnte sie allerdings durch ihren Einsatz Sébastiens Leben retten, wäre das für sie das höchste Glück. Sébastien kommt zu ihr, sie begrüßen sich aufs Wärmste und öffnen eilig das Dokument. Doch es schlägt lediglich einen schäbigen Tauschhandel vor: Wenn Sébastien auf die Krone und alle Anrechte darauf verzichtet, wird er Spanien ausgeliefert. Er erklärt, niemals einen derart schändlichen Vertrag unterschreiben zu können. Zayda stimmt ihm zu, und als eine Uhr die volle Stunde schlägt, bereitet sie sich auf den Tod vor.

Die Inquisitoren treten ein. Nun begreift Sébastien die Zusammenhänge, ändert sofort seine Meinung und will das Dokument unterzeichnen. Doch jetzt ist es an Zayda, ihm zu widersprechen: Wenn er das tue, werde sie sich ins Meer stürzen. Dennoch unterschreibt er das Dokument und händigt es den Inquisitoren aus.

Als diese sich zurückziehen, will Zayda ihre Drohung wahrmachen. Doch dann ist von unten eine Barkarole zu hören, und wenig später tritt Camoëns auf. Er erklärt, dass am Fuß des Turms eine von ihm bereitgestellte Barke auf sie warte, zu der sie mit Hilfe einer Strickleiter gelangen könnten, die er bei sich hat.

2. Szene Die Kulisse zeigt jetzt den Turm von außen und das darunter liegende Meer. Zayda und Camoëns sind bereits zu einer Bastion auf halber Höhe abgestiegen, und dann gesellt sich auch Sébastien zu ihnen. Gleichzeitig erscheinen Dom Antonio und Abayaldos am Fuß des Turms. Abayaldos ist außer sich ob der Vorstellung, die Häftlinge könnten entkommen, doch Antonio erklärt ihm kalt lächelnd, dies sei nur Teil eines durchdachten Plans. Als Zayda und Sébastien weiter absteigen, erscheinen oben im Turm Soldaten und schneiden die Strickleiter durch, so dass die Geliebten in den Tod stürzen. Dann feuern die Soldaten auf Camoëns, der ihnen verwundet in die Tiefe folgt. Frohlockend erklärt Antonio sich zum König, doch da erscheint Dom Juam de Sylva und zerschlägt seine Träume, indem er ihm das von Sébastien unterzeichnete Dokument zeigt, mit dem das Königreich an Spanien fällt. Camoëns wird sterbend hereingetragen und verlangt lautstarl nach Sébastien, während Dom Juam Philipp II. zum König ausruft. In der Ferne sieht man die spanische Flotte herbeisegeln.

Italian

Atto I

Nel porto di Lisbona i marinai stanno completando i preparativi per l’imbarco di Dom Sébastien e del suo esercito, diretti in nord Africa, ma la spedizione lascia il terreno aperto ai complotti. Lo zio di Sébastien, Dom Antonio, che governerà come reggente durante la sua assenza, si rallegra alla prospettiva di liberarsi del nipote e prendere il potere, che intende condividere con il grande Inquisitore, Juam de Sylva. Quest’ultimo, tuttavia, nutre un proprio piano segreto: in cambio della garanzia di un favore costante, è deciso a vendere il Portogallo a Filippo II di Spagna.

Dom Antonio è infastidito da un lacero soldato che desidera parlare con il Re. Cerca di mandarlo via, ma Sébastien, che entra in questo momento, è indignato che a uno dei suoi sudditi venga proibito di avvicinarlo. Il soldato è in realtà il poeta Camoëns, e chiede il permesso di accompagnare la spedizione in Africa. Sébastien accetta, ma poi Camoëns chiede un altro favore. Richiama l’attenzione del Re su una processione di inquisitori che conducono al rogo una delle loro vittime, una giovane donna proveniente dal Marocco. Si tratta di Zayda che, dopo essere stata catturata e fatta convertire al cristianesimo, è stata sopraffatta dalla nostalgia del proprio paese e fermata mentre tentava di fuggire per fare ritorno in patria. Sébastien ne ha compassione, ma suscita il risentimento dei sacerdoti quando commuta la sua sentenza all’esilio perpetuo, in Marocco, nella casa di suo padre.

Rivolgendo la propria attenzione all’imbarco imminente, il re chiede a Camoëns di improvvisare un componimento poetico sulla partenza. Camoëns profetizza che l’esercito sarà costretto ad affrontare forze molto superiori, ma sollecita i Portoghesi a continuare ad avanzare senza timore. A questo punto il cielo viene oscurato da una minaccia di tempesta e Camoëns finisce per annunciare la sconfitta dell’esercito portoghese: la sua esortazione ai soldati adesso è di salvare il loro re. Allarmato per la piega che sta prendendo il componimento, Sébastien interviene e Camoëns, mentre il cielo si rasserena, ordina a tutti di abbassare le bandiere davanti al sole che sicuramente splenderà sulle loro gesta. Tutti pregano per il successo della spedizione, tranne Juam de Sylva, che pronuncia parole ambigue (‘Che la Provvidenza si degni di esaudire i nostri desideri’), Dom Antonio, che spera in cuor suo che la spedizione non faccia mai ritorno, e gli inquisitori, i quali scagliano un anatema contro il re che ha sfidato la loro autorità. Sébastien e i suoi seguaci si imbarcano.

Atto II.

Scena 1. Nella casa di suo padre, Ben-Selim, governatore di Fez, Zayda è festeggiata dalle sue compagne, che pregustano il suo previsto matrimonio con il capo arabo Abayaldos. La donna tuttavia rimane pensosa e triste: si è innamorata di Sébastien.

Ben-Selim ha organizzato delle danze per distrarla, ma irrompe Abayaldos, su tutte le furie: non si può perdere tempo in frivolezze nel momento in cui il Marocco viene invaso dagli stranieri. Tutti gli uomini rispondono alla sua chiamata alle armi e prendono le spade. Abayaldos chiede a Zayda la promessa di concedergli la propria mano in premio per il valore che dimostrerà in battaglia, ma la donna – comprensibilmente, considerati i suoi sentimenti nei confronti di Sébastien – non riesce a farlo.

Scena 2. La pianura di Alcazar-Kebir, dopo la sconfitta dei Portoghesi. Dom Sébastien è circondato da alcuni ufficiali. Tutti sono feriti. Un’orda di Arabi si riversa sulla scena, in cerca del re, e uno degli ufficiali in fin di vita, Dom Henrique de Sandoval, salva la vita di Sébastien dichiarando di essere lui l’uomo che cercano. Tutti i Portoghesi vengono fatti prigionieri e trascinati via, tranne Sébastien, che ha perso i sensi a causa del sangue perduto.

Zayda entra furtiva e trova Sébastien ancora vivo. Lo rianima e gli fascia le ferite, dichiarandogli il proprio amore: vuole dedicarsi a lui per tutta la vita. Il ferito la scambia per un angelo inviato dal cielo.

A questo punto ritornano Abayaldos e gli Arabi, ancora assetati di sangue. Senza rivelare la sua identità Zayda supplica che sia risparmiata la vita di Sébastien. Racconta che, quando le era stata salvata la vita a Lisbona, aveva giurato che avrebbe ricambiato salvando a sua volta un Portoghese. Abayaldos accetta di esaudire il suo desiderio a condizione che la donna accetti di sposarlo. Non avendo alcuna alternativa, Zayda cede e si lascia condurre via.

Rimasto solo, Sébastien lamenta il proprio destino. La sua unica consolazione è la devozione di Zayda.

Atto III.

Scena 1. Nel palazzo reale di Lisbona, Dom Antonio, adesso re a tutti gli effetti, riceve l’ambasciatore del Marocco. Si tratta di Abayaldos, accompagnato da una donna velata: è Zayda, ormai sua moglie, che è stata costretta ad accompagnarlo.

Marito e moglie si ritrovano da soli e si scopre che il matrimonio è un fallimento. Abayaldos ritiene di non essere amato e tradito nei pensieri se non nei fatti. L’unica ragione per cui ha portato Zayda a Lisbona è la sua estrema gelosia: vuole tenerla d’occhio. La donna, da parte sua, dichiara che il marito può anche ucciderla, ma lei si riserva il diritto di odiarlo [trans. note: this is not in the libretto. She simply implores her husband to have mercy]…..

Scena 2.

La piazza della Cattedrale di Lisbona, di notte. Entra Camoëns, ferito e demoralizzato: ritorna in patria senza un quattrino ed è costretto a mendicare per poter sopravvivere. Passa la ronda e i soldati, venendo a sapere che lui viene dall’Africa, lo avvertono di non rivelare il fatto: il nuovo re, Antonio, non ha simpatia per I sudditi del suo predecessore.

Per coincidenza, la prima persona a cui Camoëns chiede la carità è proprio Dom Sébastien, anche lui tristemente di ritorno a Lisbona. Entrambi si salutano calorosamente, ma vengono interrotti dal triste suono di un corteo funebre che si avvicina. Si tratta dei falsi funerali del re, organizzati da suo zio, Dom Antonio. Questo è troppo per Camoëns, sdegnato che si possa offendere così il vero re. Juam de Sylva cerca di placare la protesta e fare arrestare Camoëns, ma Sébastien si fa avanti per difenderlo. Tutti lo riconoscono, sbalorditi, ma Abayaldos, che per caso si trova tra gli astanti e si rende conto che si tratta dello stesso uomo a cui ha salvato la vita, dichiara di aver sepolto il vero re ad Alcazar-Kebir. Riprendendosi dalla sorpresa, Juam de Sylva, dichiara che Sébastien è un impostore. Lo fa arrestare e lo consegna agli inquisitori; mentre il corteo riprende il suo percorso, Sébastien viene trascinato via. Sfinito, Camoëns perde i sensi tra le braccia di coloro che gli stanno intorno.

Atto IV.

Una sala sotterranea dell’Inquisizione. Quando i membri del Sant’Uffizio si sono riuniti, viene condotto Dom Sébastien. Alle domande di Juam de Sylva, dichiara che gli inquisitori non hanno diritto di processarlo e rifiuta di essere ulteriormente interrogato.

Juam de Sylva annuncia che un testimone attende di essere ascoltato, ed entra Zayda, la quale dichiara che l’uomo morto ad Alcazar-Kebir era Dom Henrique, e che Sébastien è stato salvato da una donna, lei in persona. L’Inquisitore la riconosce e l’accusa: è lei l’apostata che, grazie all’intervento di Sébastien, era sfuggita al rogo. Ogni minima possibilità di influenzare il processo a favore di Sébastien si dilegua rapidamente e viene completamente distrutta quando Abayaldos, che si aggirava in fondo alla scena, si fa avanti e la taccia di adulterio. A questo punto la donna si ritiene libera da ogni obbligo matrimoniale e dichiara coraggiosamente e con orgoglio il proprio amore per Sébastien. Juam de Sylva la fa arrestare, deciso a mettere a morte lei e Sébastien, che vengono trascinati via in direzioni diverse.

Atto V.

In una torre adiacente alle prigioni dell’Inquisizione, Juam de Sylva, in conversazione con Dom Luis, inviato spagnolo, consuma il suo tradimento con un contratto di vendita del Portogallo a Filippo II. Quindi fa portare Zayda e le comunica che è disposto a risparmiare Sébastien se lei riuscirà a convincerlo a firmare un documento preparato da lui. Zayda è ben disposta a cogliere qualunque possibilità di salvare la vita di Sébastien e promette. Juam de Sylva le concede un’ora di tempo: in caso di fallimento l’attende la morte.

Rimasta sola, Zayda scopre che la prospettiva di morire non l’intimorisce più. Poter essere il mezzo per salvare la vita di Sébastien è vera felicità. Ben presto arriva Sébastien ed entrambi si salutano calorosamente e aprono con impazienza il documento. Ma si tratta di un patto che gli offre la libertà a condizione di rinunciare alla corona e ai propri diritti a favore di Filippo II. Il re dichiara che non potrà mai firmare un patto vergognoso che lo condanna all’ignominia. Zayda è d’accordo e al suono dei rintocchi dell’orologio, si prepara a morire.

Entrano gli inquisitori. Sébastien comprende adesso cosa sta per accadere, cambia idea immediatamente e si decide a firmare. Adesso è Zayda a protestare e minacciare di gettarsi in mare. L’uomo firma comunque e consegna il documento agli inquisitori.

Mentre gli inquisitori si ritirano, Zayda si precipita verso la finestra. Ma dal basso arriva il suono di una barcarola e un attimo dopo compare Camoëns. Ha una barca che li attende ai piedi della torre e porta con sé una scala fatta di funi per farli scendere.

Scena 2.

La scena si sposta all’esterno della torre: in basso c’è il mare. Zayda e Camoëns sono già scesi fino a un bastione e qui li raggiunge Sébastien. Contemporaneamente, sotto la torre compaiono Dom Antonio e Abayaldos. Abayaldos teme che i prigionieri possano tentare la fuga, ma Antonio dichiara freddamente che anche questo fa parte di un piano deliberato. Mentre Zayda e Sébastien riprendono la discesa, compaiono dei soldati in cima alla torre e tagliano la scala di corda: gli innamorati precipitano in mare, verso la morte, seguiti dal disperato Camoëns. Antonio, gongolante, si dichiara re, ma Dom Juam de Sylva, che compare in questo momento, gli toglie ogni illusione, mostrandogli il documento firmato da Sébastien, che cede il regno alla Spagna. Camoëns, morente, viene portato in scena da un gruppo di marinai, e continua a invocare Sébastien anche mentre Dom Juam proclama re Filippo II. In lontananza si profila la flotta spagnola.

French

Acte I.

Le port de Lisbonne où des marins se livrent aux derniers préparatifs en vue du départ de Dom Sébastien et de ses troupes pour l’Afrique du Nord. On apprend que Dom Sébastien a des ennemis à l’intérieur de son royaume. Dom Antonio, oncle de Sébastien qui fera office de régent en son absence, se réjouit à la perspective d’être débarrassé de son neveu et de pouvoir s’emparer du pouvoir. Il entend gouverner avec le Grand Inquisiteur, Dom Juam de Sylva. Mais celui-ci a ses propres plans : il est bien décidé à vendre le Portugal au roi Philippe II d’Espagne afin de continuer à bénéficier de sa protection.

Importuné par un vieux soldat miteux qui souhaite parler au roi, Dom Antonio essaie de s’en débarrasser. Sébastien, arrivé sur ces entrefaites, est indigné de voir qu’on empêche un de ses hommes de l’approcher. Le soldat en question est un poète du nom de Camoëns qui souhaite se joindre à l’expédition en Afrique. Sébastien ayant accédé à sa requête, Camoëns lui demande une nouvelle faveur en lui montrant une procession d’Inquisiteurs conduisant une de leurs victimes, une jeune femme, au supplice. C’est Zayda, une Marocaine capturée et convertie au christianisme, qui a été appréhendée alors que, succombant au mal du pays, elle tentait de fuir pour rejoindre sa terre natale. Sébastien prend pitié d’elle et s’attire le ressentiment des religieux en commuant sa sentence de mort en exil à perpétuité – au Maroc, dans la maison de son père.

Comme l’embarquement imminent mobilise à nouveau son attention, le roi demande à Camoëns d’improviser un poème de départ. Camoëns commence par prophétiser que l’armée devra affronter des troupes infiniment supérieures tout en encourageant les Portugais à partir sans peur. Puis, comme le ciel s’assombrit et que la tempête menace, Camoëns, inspiré par les éléments, se met à prédire la déroute de l’armée portugaise et appelle les soldats à secourir leur roi. Inquiet du tour que prend le poème, Sébastien intervient et, tandis que le ciel se rassérène, Camoëns convie les soldats à incliner leurs oriflammes devant le soleil qui, nul doute, brillera sur leurs exploits. Tout le monde prie pour le succès de l’expédition, à l’exception de Don Juam – qui prononce des paroles ambiguës (« Que la Providence daigne exaucer mes vœux ») et espère en secret que personne ne reviendra de cette expédition – et des Inquisiteurs, qui maudissent le roi qui a bravé leur autorité. Sébastien et ses hommes embarquent.

Acte II.

Scène 1. Dans la maison de son père, le gouverneur de Fez, Ben-Selim, Zayda est fêtée par ses compagnes, impatientes de la voir épouser Abayaldos, le chef arabe. Zayda est toutefois triste et songeuse car elle a donné son cœur à Sébastien.

Ben-Selim a organisé des danses pour la divertir, mais Abayaldos les interrompt, furieux qu’on perde son temps à des frivolités pendant que des étrangers envahissent le Maroc. Tous les hommes présents répondent à son appel aux armes et saisissent leur épée. Abayaldos presse Zayda de lui promettre son cœur en récompense de ses prouesses sur le champ de bataille, mais elle en est incapable – réaction naturelle vu ses sentiments pour Sébastien.

Scène 2. La plaine de Ksar el-Kébir, après la défaite des Portugais. Dom Sébastien est entouré de quelques officiers. Tous sont blessés. Une horde d’Arabes fait irruption sur la scène. Ils cherchent le roi. L’un des officiers agonisants, Dom Henrique de Sandale, sauve la vie de Sébastien en prétendant qu’il est celui qu’on recherche. Tous les Portugais – sauf Sébastien qui s’est évanoui après avoir perdu beaucoup de sang – sont faits prisonniers.

Zayda apparaît furtivement et trouve Sébastien encore vivant. Elle le ranime et panse ses blessures en lui avouant qu’elle l’aime et qu’elle lui consacrera le restant de ses jours. Sébastien, quant à lui, la prend pour un ange venu du Ciel.

Sur ces entrefaites, Abayaldos et les Arabes toujours assoiffés de sang réapparaissent. Sans révéler l’identité de Sébastien, Zayda plaide pour sa vie. Elle explique que lorsque le roi du Portugal lui a sauvé la vie à Lisbonne, elle a fait le vœu de sauver la vie d’un Portugais. Abayaldos parlemente : il lui accordera la faveur demandée à condition – et à la seule condition – qu’elle consente à l’épouser. En l’absence d’alternative, elle finit par accepter et se laisse emmener.

Se retrouvant seul, Sébastien lamente son sort. Le dévouement de Zayda est son seul réconfort.

Acte III.

Scène 1. Dans le palais royal de Lisbonne, Dom Antonio, qui occupe maintenant le trône, reçoit l’ambassadeur marocain. Il s’agit d’Abayaldos et personne ne sait encore que l’épouse dont il s’est fait accompagner est Zayda.

Quand les deux époux se retrouvent en tête-à-tête, on découvre que leur union ne repose sur rien. Abayaldos se sent mal-aimé et trahi en pensée sinon dans les faits. S’il a obligé Zayda à l’accompagner à Lisbonne, c’est uniquement par jalousie afin de la surveiller. Zayda déclare, de son côté, qu’elle laissera volontiers son mari la tuer et se réserve le droit de le haïr.

Scène 2.

La grande place située devant la cathédrale of Lisbonne, la nuit. Camoëns fait son entrée. De retour au pays, il est mortifié de se retrouver sans le sou et obligé de mendier pour survivre. Des soldats faisant leur ronde passent près de lui. En apprenant qu’il rentre d’Afrique, l’un d’eux lui conseille de ne pas le dire trop haut : le nouveau roi, Antonio, n’a aucune tendresse pour les hommes de son prédécesseur.

Par coïncidence, la première personne à qui Camoëns demande l’aumône se trouve être Dom Sébastien, lui aussi de retour à Lisbonne et en guère meilleure posture. Leurs retrouvailles chaleureuses sont interrompues par l’approche d’une procession funéraire. À sa grande consternation, Sébastien s’aperçoit que ce sont ses propres funérailles officielles organisées avec ostentation par son oncle Dom Antonio. C’en est trop pour Camoëns, qui proteste : personne ne devrait outrager ainsi le véritable roi. Dom Juam de Sylva essaie de mettre fin à l’agitation en faisant arrêter Camoëns, mais Sébastien se porte à son secours. Tout le monde est surpris de le reconnaître. Abayaldos est dans la foule : reconnaissant en lui l’homme dont il a épargné la vie, il déclare que le vrai roi est enterré à Ksar el-Kébir . Se remettant de son choc, Dom Juam de Sylva accuse Sébastien d’imposture. Il le menace des foudres de l’Inquisition, le fait arrêter et, tandis que la procession reprend son chemin, le fait emmener. Succombant à l’épuisement, Camoëns s’évanouit dans les bras des passants.

Acte IV

Une salle souterraine qui sert à l’Inquisition. Les représentants de l’Inquisition se réunissent et font comparaître Dom Sébastien devant eux. Interrogé par Dom Juam lui-même, il refuse de reconnaître aux Inquisiteurs le droit de le juger et de répondre à leurs questions.

Dom Juam annonce qu’un témoin demande à être entendu. Zayda apparaît. Elle déclare que l’homme qui est mort à Ksar el-Kébir se nommait Dom Henrique et que Sébastien a été sauvé par une femme – elle, en l’occurrence. La reconnaissant, Dom Juam l’accuse d’être l’apostate condamnée au bûcher qui a échappé à l’Inquisition grâce à l’intervention de Sébastien. Toute possibilité d’influer de manière positive sur le cours du procès s’évanouit vite et plus aucun espoir n’est permis lorsqu’Abayaldos, qui assistait discrètement à la scène, s’avance et accuse Zayda d’adultère. Se sentant libérée de toute obligation envers lui, Zayda proclame fièrement son amour pour Sébastien. Déterminé à faire mourir Zayda et Sébastien, Dom Juam l’a fait arrêter et les amants sont emmenés dans des directions opposées.

Acte V

Dans une tour qui jouxte les prisons de l’Inquisition, Dom Juam de Sylva est en conversation avec Dom Luis, l’envoyé du roi d’Espagne : parachevant sa traîtrise, il s’apprête à vendre le Portugal à Philip II. Il fait ensuite amener Zayda pour lui annoncer qu’il épargnera Sébastien si elle accepte de persuader celui-ci de signer un document préparé à son intention. Prête à tout pour sauver Sébastien, Zayda s’engage à obtenir cette signature. Dom Juam lui donne une heure pour y parvenir : si elle échoue, elle mourra.

Restée seule, Zayda s’aperçoit que la perspective de mourir ne l’effraie plus. Pourtant elle ne serait que trop heureuse de sauver Sébastien. Après de tendres retrouvailles, ils ouvrent fébrilement le document. Il s’agit d’un accord stipulant que Sébastien renonce à la couronne et à ses droits sur le Portugal pour être ensuite livré à l’Espagne. Il lui serait impossible, dit-il, de jamais signer un document aussi abject et honteux. Zayda partage ses sentiments et, entendant l’heure sonner, se prépare à mourir.

Les Inquisiteurs entrent. Comprenant alors la situation, Sébastien change soudain d’avis et s’apprête à signer. C’est maintenant à Zayda de protester : s’il fait cela, elle se jettera à la mer. Il ne se revire pas pour autant et remet le document dûment signé aux Inquisiteurs.

Tandis que les Inquisiteurs se retirent, Zayda va pour mettre sa menace à exécution. Le son d’une barcarolle se fait alors entendre en contrebas et, quelques instants plus tard, Camoëns apparaît. Il les informe qu’une barque les attend au pied de la tour et leur remet une échelle en corde pour descendre.

Scène 2.

Le décor change pour montrer l’extérieur de la tour avec la mer en contrebas. Zayda et Camoëns ont déjà atteint un bastion à mi-hauteur de la tour, où Sébastien les rejoint. Dom Antonio et Abayaldos apparaissent à ce moment-là plus bas. Abayaldos s’inquiète de voir les prisonniers s’échapper, mais Dom Antonio lui déclare froidement que tout est prévu. Lorsque Zayda et Sébastien reprennent leur descente, des soldats apparaissent en haut de la tour et sectionnent l’échelle de corde, précipitant ainsi les amants à leur mort. Les soldats tirent maintenant sur Camoëns qui s’effondre, blessé. Dom Antonio jubile : il se déclare roi. Dom Juam de Sylva fait alors son apparition pour lui ôter toute illusion, en lui montrant la signature de Sébastien au bas du document cédant le royaume à l’Espagne. Un groupe de marins vient chercher le corps de Camoëns agonisant, qui continue d’appeler Sébastien, tandis que Dom Juam proclame Philippe II roi du Portugal. Au loin, on aperçoit la flotte espagnole qui approche.

Inserts