Donizetti: Francesca di Foix

£3.00 - £14.99 £1.50 - £7.50

1 disc set
Single Track Download

No one has ever seen Francesca, Countess of Foix (Annick Massis) because her jealous husband, The Count (Alfonso Antoniozzi), keeps her locked in a tower. You can’t really blame him.

Clear
Catalogue Number: ORC28 Categories: ,
  1. Francesca di Foix: scena I: Senti senti ? Gia l'eco ripete Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  2. Francesca di Foix: scena II: Duetto: Quest'e il loco stabilito Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  3. Francesca di Foix: scena II: Scena: Ecco il Conte ? - scena III: Che vita, della caccia Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  4. Francesca di Foix: scena IV: Cavatina: Grato accolse i vostri accenti Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  5. Francesca di Foix: scena IV: Cabaletta: Oh quale apporta all'anima Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  6. Francesca di Foix: scena IV: Recitative: Duca, e cosi? ? Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  7. Francesca di Foix: scena IV: Recitative: Voi non seguite il Re? Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  8. Francesca di Foix: scena V: Aria: Ah! ti ottenni alfin Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  9. Francesca di Foix: scena V: Cabaletta: Donzelle, se vi stimola Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  10. Francesca di Foix: scena V: Recitative: Quest'e l'anello ? - scena VI: Venite ? E' dessa? Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  11. Francesca di Foix: scena VI: Duetto: Signore, a dirvi il vero Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  12. Francesca di Foix: scena VI: Duetto: Che siete una sciocca Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  13. Francesca di Foix: scena VI: Duetto: Quante son delle civette Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  14. Francesca di Foix: scena VII: Recitative: Oh! Duca, mi rallegro! ? Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  15. Francesca di Foix: scena VIII: Canzonetta del Paggio: Vieni, e narra o bel paggetto Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  16. Francesca di Foix: scena VIII: Canzonetta del Paggio: E' una giovane straniera ? Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  17. Francesca di Foix: scena VIII: Canzonetta del Paggio: Che dan vita ad ogni festa Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  18. Francesca di Foix: scena IX: Recitative: Edmondo? - scena X: Ecco il geloso! - scena XI: La Baronessa arriva Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  19. Francesca di Foix: scena XII: Terzetto: Vi presento, o Baronessa Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  20. Francesca di Foix: scena XII: Terzetto: Questo acciar che il Sovrano vi affida Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  21. Francesca di Foix: scena XIII: Recitative: Ve' come il Conte segue al gran Torneo Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  22. Francesca di Foix: scena XIII: Romanza: Donne, che ognor piu bella Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  23. Francesca di Foix: scena XIV: Marcia: La vaga straniera Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  24. Francesca di Foix: scena XV: Finale: Scena: Ma via rasserenatevi - scena XVI: La Giostra, o Baronessa - Last scena: Miratelo ? Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  25. Francesca di Foix: Last scena: Marcia: La vaga straniera Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  26. Francesca di Foix: Last scena: Recitative: Or sia l'opra appien compita Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  27. Francesca di Foix: Last scena: Cantabile: Fausto sempre splenda il Sole Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34
  28. Francesca di Foix: Last scena: Rondo: Per voi di gelosia Donizetti, G. Buy Track 0:34

Description

No one has ever seen Francesca, Countess of Foix (Annick Massis) because her jealous husband, The Count (Alfonso Antoniozzi), keeps her locked in a tower. You can’t really blame him. His employer, the King (Pietro Spagnoli), has a famous eye for the girls. But, surely this can’t be a problem because she is so ugly. We know this because the Count tells everyone. The King is suspicious and the Page (Jennifer Larmore) and the Duke (Bruce Ford) are curious. Just how hideous can she be?A one-act opera in 1831 had little chance of survival following its initial performances. With the public’s insatiable appetite for new works, Francesca di Foix was a Donizetti heroine destined to remain on the shelf – that is, until Opera Rara came to her rescue. Now, in this witty and captivating first ever recording, the beauties of Donizetti’s charming score can once again be enjoyed today.

Booklet includes complete libretto with English translation.

‘Francesca di Foix is no inconsequential work; rather it is a gem in miniature, featuring all of the stylistic elements of primo Ottocento opera in one single act. Kudos to Opera Rara for (re)introducing it to the world’ – Denise Gallo, Opera Today

‘Once again the forces at Opera Rara have unearthed a little jewel of a piece, cast it attentively and produced it beautifully’ – Ira Siff, Opera News

Cast

Pietro Spagnoli (Il Re), Bruce Ford (Il Duca), Alfonso Antoniozzi (Il Conte), Annick Massis (La Contessa), Jennifer Larmore (Il Paggio), London Philharmonic Orchestra, Antonello Allemandi – conductor

Tracklist

01 Francesca di Foix: scena I: Senti senti ? Gia l’eco ripete
02 Francesca di Foix: scena II: Duetto: Quest’e il loco stabilito
03 Francesca di Foix: scena II: Scena: Ecco il Conte ? – scena III: Che vita, della caccia
04 Francesca di Foix: scena IV: Cavatina: Grato accolse i vostri accenti
05 Francesca di Foix: scena IV: Cabaletta: Oh quale apporta all’anima
06 Francesca di Foix: scena IV: Recitative: Duca, e cosi? ?
07 Francesca di Foix: scena IV: Recitative: Voi non seguite il Re?
08 Francesca di Foix: scena V: Aria: Ah! ti ottenni alfin
09 Francesca di Foix: scena V: Cabaletta: Donzelle, se vi stimola
10 Francesca di Foix: scena V: Recitative: Quest’e l’anello ? – scena VI: Venite ? E’ dessa?
11 Francesca di Foix: scena VI: Duetto: Signore, a dirvi il vero
12 Francesca di Foix: scena VI: Duetto: Che siete una sciocca
13 Francesca di Foix: scena VI: Duetto: Quante son delle civette
14 Francesca di Foix: scena VII: Recitative: Oh! Duca, mi rallegro! ?
15 Francesca di Foix: scena VIII: Canzonetta del Paggio: Vieni, e narra o bel paggetto
16 Francesca di Foix: scena VIII: Canzonetta del Paggio: E’ una giovane straniera ?
17 Francesca di Foix: scena VIII: Canzonetta del Paggio: Che dan vita ad ogni festa
18 Francesca di Foix: scena IX: Recitative: Edmondo? – scena X: Ecco il geloso! – scena XI: La Baronessa arriva
19 Francesca di Foix: scena XII: Terzetto: Vi presento, o Baronessa
20 Francesca di Foix: scena XII: Terzetto: Questo acciar che il Sovrano vi affida
21 Francesca di Foix: scena XIII: Recitative: Ve’ come il Conte segue al gran Torneo
22 Francesca di Foix: scena XIII: Romanza: Donne, che ognor piu bella
23 Francesca di Foix: scena XIV: Marcia: La vaga straniera
24 Francesca di Foix: scena XV: Finale: Scena: Ma via rasserenatevi – scena XVI: La Giostra, o Baronessa – Last scena: Miratelo ?
25 Francesca di Foix: Last scena: Marcia: La vaga straniera
26 Francesca di Foix: Last scena: Recitative: Or sia l’opra appien compita
27 Francesca di Foix: Last scena: Cantabile: Fausto sempre splenda il Sole
28 Francesca di Foix: Last scena: Rondo: Per voi di gelosia

English

Scene 1. In a spot set aside for hunting, close to the Palace of the Louvre, peasants are gathered to greet their King. The Duke and the Page, Edmondo, also appear, for it is here that they hope to meet Francesca, the Countess of Foix, Edmondo’s cousin. The Count, her husband, has proved so jealous and possessive that he has been holding her a virtual prisoner, shut away from the world, but the King, the Duke and Edmondo have concocted a plot to release her. They have managed to duplicate the Count’s ring, briefly removed from his hand while he was asleep, and have sent her the duplicate in her husband’s name, instructing her to come to court. Edmondo insists that she is model of beauty and winning ways, even though the Count, to avoid having to present her at court, has given out that she is ill-favoured, misshapen and coarse, ‘uglier than any harpy’.

The Count, recently appointed Master of the King’s Hunt, rejoices in his demanding duties, but laments that they necessitate his leaving his wife at home on her own – a cause for concern in a world where he believes the worst of all his fellow-men.

The King acknowledges the acclamations of his subjects and flatters the Count, assuring him that a propitious day is dawning for him. He then dismisses the peasants and himself returns to the Palace, but not before whispering to the Duke that, the moment Francesca appears, he should conduct her to court and place her in the care of his sister. The Count departs to attend to his duties, and the Duke and Edmondo mount a nearby hill to see if there is any sign of Francesca’s approach.

Francesca has, in fact, arrived by a different route. She makes her entry, rejoicing in her new-found liberty but mystified that her jealous husband should so unexpectedly have changed his mind and summoned her to join him. The Duke and Edmondo, returning, greet her. Edmondo goes to inform the King of her arrival, and the Duke admits that it was the Page and the King who sent her the ring, not her husband. He is unable to explain further, since it is the King who has masterminded the plot and who alone knows its details. Francesca is in two minds whether to stay or whether to return to her prison, but when she hears that her husband has reported her ‘a silly goose, a yokel, and mannerless… foul and lame’, she is quite sufficiently piqued to be eager for revenge.

Before they can proceed to court the Count returns. Francesca hastily covers her face with a veil and is presented to him as the Baroness of Linsberg, the Duke’s widowed cousin who has arrived from England. Although her stature and voice arouse the Count’s suspicions, he can only hope that he will have an opportunity of ascertaining her true identity at court, whither they all depart.

Scene 2. In the royal apartments in the Louvre, the courtiers try to sift the Page for information concerning the mysterious new arrival, but Edmondo parries their enquiries, declaring only that it is the King’s intention to amuse himself. He is also tackled by the Count, frustrated since he has had no chance of seeing the lady’s face, even though he grows ever more suspicious that she is really his wife.

The King instructs Edmondo to inform the lady that he wishes to make her acquaintance and conduct her to a tournament which is about to take place. She appears, with both the King and the Count vying with each other – for different reasons – to behold her. It is a moment of supreme – and supremely comic – climax. The King takes delight in presenting Francesca, with exaggerated courtesy, to the Count. She plays up to the situation, commiserating with the Count that his wife should be ‘oppressed in years… a compendium of all ills’, and graciously enquiring after her health. The Count himself writhes in agony, recognising her yet unable, after all he has said, to claim her as his wife.

A trumpet call announces the Tournament. The King asks the Countess to accept the task of presenting his sword to the victor. She, in turn, seeks to mollify her husband – or perhaps to goad him still further – by exhorting him to contest the prize and prove himself first in the field. And he can only regret that advancing age precludes the possibility of his fulfilling her wishes. All depart except for the Duke, who lingers a moment to admit that he would probably be just as jealous as the Count, were he himself blessed with such a wife.

Scene 3. The tournament ground outside the Louvre, where the jousting has just concluded. While all comment on Francesca’s charm and beauty, Edmondo continues to taunt the Count who, tortured and miserable since he no longer has any doubts regarding her identity, wonders whether he will ever succeed in recovering her.

Francesca asks the identity of the unknown knight who has won the tournament, and it is revealed that it is none other than the King himself. She girds him with the victor’s sword, and he, in turn, expresses a wish to see her joined in marriage with someone who has long admired her: the Duke. She consents, but only upon condition that he will not prove as jealous as her previous husband, whom she describes as deceased. As the King gives them his blessing and is about to unite them, it all becomes too much for the Count, who protests that the lady is his wife. He is obliged to eat humble pie, and confess that all he has said about her was a lie.

The Page explains the mystery of the duplicated ring, and the opera ends upon a note of celebration as all hope that the Count has learned his lesson and will, in future, show the fair sex greater respect and prove less jealous and severe.

English

1. Szene

In einem Jagdgebiet in der Nähe des Louvre-Palasts haben Bauern sich versammelt, um ihrem König zu huldigen. Auch der Herzog und der Page Edmondo stellen sich ein, denn sie hoffen, hier Edmondos Kusine Francesca zu treffen, die Gräfin von Foix. Der Graf, ihr Mann, ist derart eifersüchtig und besitzergreifend, dass er sie praktisch als Gefangene der Welt fern hält. Deshalb haben der König, der Herzog und Edmondo einen Befreiungsplan geschmiedet. Es ist ihnen gelungen, den Ring des Grafen zu kopieren, den sie ihm im Schlaf kurz vom Finger nahmen, und ließen Francesca diese Kopie im Namen ihres Mannes bringen mit der Aufforderung, bei Hofe zu erscheinen. Edmondo beteuert, dass sie der Inbegriff von Schönheit und Liebreiz ist, obwohl der Graf sie als verunstaltet und derb, „hässlicher als eine Hexe“ bezeichnet, um sie nicht bei Hof vorstellen zu müssen.

Der Graf, der vor kurzem zum Meister der königlichen Jagd ernannt wurde, freut sich über diese anspruchsvolle Aufgabe, ist aber voll Sorge, weil er seine Gemahlin alleine zu Hause lassen muss – und das in einer Welt, in der er von seinen Mitmenschen stets das Schlimmste erwartet.

Der König nimmt die Huldigungen seiner Untertanen entgegen und schmeichelt dem Grafen mit der Versicherung, dass ihm ein verheißungsvoller Tag bevorstehe. Dann entlässt er die Bauern und kehrt selbst zum Palast zurück, doch zuvor flüstert er dem Herzog zu, dass dieser Francesca gleich nach ihrem Eintreffen zum Hof geleiten und der Obhut seiner Schwester anvertrauen soll. Der Graf geht davon, um seinen Aufgaben nachzukommen, während der Herzog und Edmondo auf einen Hügel steigen, um nach Francesca Ausschau zu halten.

Diese hat jedoch einen anderen Weg genommen. Sie tritt auf und frohlockt über ihre wiedergewonnene Freiheit, äußert aber auch Erstaunen, dass ihr eifersüchtiger Gemahl so unvermittelt seine Meinung geändert und sie zu sich an den Hof bestellt haben soll. Der Herzog und Edmondo kehren zurück und heißen sie willkommen. Während Edmondo dem König Bericht von Francescas Ankunft erstattet, klärt der Herzog sie auf, dass nicht ihr Gemahl ihr den Ring hat zukommen lassen, sondern der Page und der König. Weitere Erklärungen könne er ihr aber nicht geben, da der König selbst den Plan ausgearbeitet habe und der Einzige sei, der ihn in allen Einzelheiten kenne. Francesca ist unschlüssig, ob sie bleiben oder in ihr Gefängnis zurückkehren soll, doch als sie erfährt, dass ihr Gemahl sie als „dumme Gans, als Landpomeranze ohne jeden Benimm … abscheulich und lahm“ bezeichnet hat, willigt sie aus Zorn in den Racheplan ein.

Doch bevor sie zum Hof aufbrechen können, kehrt der Graf zurück. Rasch zieht Francesca einen Schleier vor ihr Gesicht und wird ihm als Baroness von Linsberg vorgestellt, die verwitwete Kusine des Herzogs und soeben aus England eingetroffen. Ob ihrer Gestalt und ihrer Stimme schöpft der Graf sofort Verdacht und hofft, am Hof ihre wahre Identität herausfinden zu können. Gemeinsam brechen sie dorthin auf.

2. Szene

In den königlichen Gemächern im Louvre bedrängen die Höflinge den Pagen nach Auskunft über die geheimnisvolle Dame, aber Edmondo wehrt alle Fragen ab und erklärt nur, der König wolle unterhalten werden. Auch der Graf dringt in ihn, denn bislang hatte er zu seinem Leidwesen noch nicht die Gelegenheit, das Gesicht der Unbekannten zu sehen, auch wenn sein Verdacht wächst, dass es sich bei ihr um seine Gemahlin handelt.

Der König trägt Edmondo auf, der Dame mitzuteilen, dass er ihre Bekanntschaft zu machen und sie zu einem Turnier zu geleiten wünsche, das in Kürze beginnen werde. Als sie erscheint, wetteifern sowohl der König als auch der Graf darum, einen Blick auf ihr Gesicht zu werfen – allerdings aus unterschiedlichen Gründen. Es ist ein höchst spannungsreicher und ungemein komischer Moment.

Mit großem Vergnügen und übertriebener Höflichkeit stellt der König Francesca dem Grafen vor. Sie spielt das Spiel formvollendet mit, bedauert den Grafen, dass seine Gemahlin „fortgeschritten in Jahren … ein Inbegriff aller Übel“ sei, und erkundigt sich angelegentlich nach ihrer Gesundheit. Der Graf, der sie erkennt, doch nach allem, was er über sie verbreitet hat, unmöglich als seine Gemahlin zu erkennen geben kann, durchleidet Höllenqualen.

Ein Fanfarenstoß verkündet den Beginn des Turniers. Der König bittet die Gräfin, dem Sieger am Ende sein Schwert zu überreichen. Sie ihrerseits fordert ihren Gemahl auf – sei es, um ihn zu beschwichtigen, sei es, um ihn noch mehr aufzustacheln –, um den Preis zu kämpfen und sich auf dem Turnierfeld zu behaupten. Bedauernd muss er ablehnen und erklären, sein vorgerücktes Alter gestatte ihm nicht, ihren Wunsch zu erfüllen. Alle treten ab bis auf den Herzog, der einen Moment verweilt und gesteht, dass er vermutlich ebenso eifersüchtig wäre wie der Graf, wenn ihm eine derartige Gemahlin vergönnt wäre.

3. Szene

Der Turnierplatz vor dem Louvre, wo der Kampf soeben zu Ende ging. Während sich alle in Lobpreisungen über Francescas Liebreiz und Schönheit ergehen, reizt Edmondo den Grafen immer mehr, der mittlerweile keinerlei Zweifel mehr an der Identität der Dame hat, Qualen aussteht und sich fragt, ob er sie wohl je wieder zur Seinen wird erklären können.

Francesca erkundigt sich nach dem unbekannten Ritter, der soeben das Turnier gewonnen hat, und erfährt, dass es niemand anderer ist als der König selbst. Sie gürtet ihn mit dem Schwert des Siegers, und er spricht von seinem Wunsch, sie mit einem Mann zu vermählen, der schon lange große Bewunderung für sie hege: dem Herzog. Sie willigt ein, aber nur unter der Bedingung, dass dieser nicht ebenso eifersüchtig sei wie ihr erster Gemahl, der ihrer Auskunft nach verstorben sei. Während der König dem Paar seinen Segen erteilt und sie gerade trauen will, platzt der Graf heraus, dass es sich bei der Dame um seine Gemahlin handelt. So ist er gezwungen, zu Kreuze zu kriechen und zu gestehen, dass er bislang nur Lügen über sie verbreitet hat.

Der Page erklärt das Geheimnis des kopierten Rings, und die Oper endet auf einer freudigen Note, denn alle hoffen, dass der Graf seine Lektion gelernt hat und dem schwachen Geschlecht in Zukunft mehr Achtung erweisen und sich weniger eifersüchtig und streng verhalten wird.

English

Scena 1. In una riserva di caccia, vicino al palazzo del Louvre, i contadini sono riuniti per salutare il loro re. Arrivano anche il Duca e il paggio Edmondo, che sperano di incontrare qui Francesca, contessa di Foix e cugina di Edmondo. Il conte suo marito è talmente geloso e possessivo da tenerla praticamente prigioniera, lontana dal mondo, ma il Re, il Duca ed Edmondo hanno architettato un piano per liberarla. Sono riusciti a creare una copia dell’anello del Conte, sottraendolo momentaneamente a lui mentre dormiva, e l’hanno inviata alla donna a nome del marito, chiedendole di recarsi a corte. Edmondo insiste che la donna è un modello di bellezza e modi seducenti, anche se il conte, per evitare di presentarla a corte, ha fatto capire che è sgraziata, deforme e rozza, “brutta più di un’arpia”.

Il Conte, di recente nominato capocaccia reale, è lieto dei suoi difficili doveri, ma si lamenta perché lo costringono ad abbandonare sola in casa la moglie; la cosa lo preoccupa, in un mondo in cui è impossibile fidarsi del resto dell’umanità.

Il Re ascolta le acclamazioni dei sudditi e lusinga il conte, assicurandolo che per lui questo è un giorno propizio. Poi licenzia i contadini e ritorna al Palazzo, ma non prima di ordinare sottovoce al Duca di condurre a corte Francesca, non appena sarà arrivata, e affidarla alle cure di sua sorella. Il Conte si allontana per adempiere ai suoi compiti e il Duca ed Edmondo si appostano su una collina vicina per spiare il sopraggiungere della donna.

In realtà Francesca è arrivata da un’altra strada. Entra, lieta della ritrovata libertà, ma perplessa dell’inaspettato cambiamento d’idea del geloso marito che le ha chiesto di raggiungerlo. Il Duca ed Edmondo, di ritorno, la salutano. Edmondo va a informare il Re del suo arrivo e il Duca ammette che sono stati il paggio e il re a inviarle l’anello, non il marito. Non è in grado di spiegare altro: il piano è stato architettato dal sovrano, l’unico a conoscerne i particolari. Francesca è combattuta e non sa se rimanere o tornare alla sua prigione, ma quando viene a sapere che il marito l’ha descritta come una donna brutta, sciocca e priva di buone maniere, è sufficientemente risentita da volersi vendicare.

Prima che la donna possa proseguire verso la corte, ritorna il Conte. Francesca si copre in fretta il viso con un velo e gli viene presentata con il nome di Baronessa di Linsberg, una cugina del Duca vedova giunta dall’Inghilterra. Sebbene la sua statura e la sua voce suscitino i sospetti del Conte, l’uomo può solo augurarsi di avere una possibilità di accertare la sua vera identità a corte e tutti si allontanano.

Scena 2. Negli appartamenti reali del Louvre i cortigiani cercano di strappare al Paggio informazioni sul misterioso nuovo arrivo, ma Edmondo schiva le domande, dichiarando solo che il Re ha intenzione di divertirsi. Viene anche affrontato dal Conte, spazientito perché non ha avuto la possibilità di vedere in volto la donna, anche se sospetta sempre di più che si tratti veramente di sua moglie.

Il sovrano ordina a Edmondo di informare la signora che desidera fare la sua conoscenza e condurla a un torneo che sta per svolgersi. Compare la donna mentre il Re e il Conte fanno a gara per osservarla, per ragioni diverse. È un momento di grandissima comicità. Il Re si diverte a presentare Francesca, con esagerata cortesia, al Conte. La donna si presta al gioco e compiange il Conte che ha una moglie “oppressa dagli anni… un compendio di tutti i mali” e chiede generosamente notizie della sua salute. Il Conte si contorce tra i tormenti: l’ha riconosciuta, ma non può ammettere che è sua moglie, dopo tutto quello che ha detto prima.

Una tromba annuncia il torneo. Il Re chiede alla Contessa di accettare il compito di donare la sua spada al vincitore. La donna, a sua volta, cerca di addolcire il marito, o forse di provocarlo ancora di più, esortandolo a partecipare e dimostrarsi il primo in campo. E l’uomo non può che rimpiangere il fatto che l’età avanzata gli impedisca di poterla soddisfare. Tutti si allontanano, tranne il Duca, che si attarda un momento per ammettere che probabilmente sarebbe geloso come il Conte, se avesse la fortuna di avere una moglie così.

Scena 3. L’arena davanti al Louvre, dove il torneo si è appena concluso. Mentre tutti parlano del fascino e della bellezza di Francesca, Edmondo continua a stuzzicare il Conte il quale, tormentato e infelice dal momento che non ha più dubbi sulla sua identità, si chiede se riuscirà mai a riprenderla.

Francesca chiede l’identità dello sconosciuto cavaliere che ha vinto il torneo e si scopre che è il Re in persona. La donna lo aiuta a cingere la spada del vincitore e il re, a sua volta, esprime il desiderio di vederla sposata con una persona che l’ammira da molto tempo: il Duca. La donna acconsente, ma solo a condizione che non si dimostri geloso come il marito precedente, che definisce defunto. Il Re li benedice e sta per unirli; questo è troppo per il Conte, il quale protesta che la signora è sua moglie. È obbligato a umiliarsi e confessare che tutto ciò che ha detto era falso.

Il Paggio spiega il mistero della copia dell’anello e l’opera si conclude con una nota di festeggiamento: tutti si augurano che il Conte abbia imparato la lezione e impari a rispettare il sesso debole, dimostrandosi meno geloso e severo in futuro.

English

Scène 1. Sur un terrain réservé à la chasse, près du palais du Louvre, des paysans se sont réunis pour saluer le roi. Le duc et le page Edmondo se présentent en ce lieu dans l’espoir d’y rencontrer Francesca, cousine d’Edmondo et comtesse de Foix. Le comte, son époux, est si jaloux et possessif qu’il la retient pratiquement prisonnière, à l’écart du monde. Aussi le roi, le duc et Edmondo ont-ils conçu ensemble un plan pour lui rendre la liberté. Ils ont réussi à faire faire un double de la chevalière du comte – qu’on lui a brièvement ôté du doigt pendant son sommeil –, et se sont servi de ce double pour mander la comtesse à la cour. Edmondo n’a que louanges pour la beauté et le charme de sa cousine, que le comte, pour éviter de présenter son épouse à la cour, a décrite comme une femme déplaisante, difforme et vulgaire, « plus laide qu’une harpie ».

Le comte, récemment nommé Grand Maître d’équipage par le roi, se félicite de s’être vu confier cette tâche difficile, mais se désole d’avoir à laisser sa femme seule en province – inquiétude d’autant plus grande pour lui qu’il pense le pire de tout le monde.

Le roi répond aux acclamations de ses sujets et flatte le comte en l’assurant de sa bonne fortune. Il congédie ensuite les paysans et rentre au palais, non sans avoir ordonné à voix basse au duc de faire conduire Francesca à la cour, dès son arrivée, et de la confier à sa propre sœur. Le comte quitte la scène pour aller remplir ses fonctions, tandis que le duc et Edmondo se rendent au sommet d’une proche colline pour voir approcher Francesca.

En fait, Francesca est arrivée par un autre chemin. Heureuse de sa liberté retrouvée, elle se demande toutefois pourquoi son jaloux mari a si brusquement changé d’avis et l’a fait mander. Le duc et Edmondo viennent la saluer. Edmondo va prévenir le roi de l’arrivée de Francesca, tandis que le duc lui avoue que c’est le page et le souverain qui lui ont envoyé la chevalière, et non pas son mari. Il n’en sait guère plus car c’est le roi qui a dirigé le complot et lui seul en connaît les détails. Partagée, Francesca ne sait pas si elle doit rester ou retourner à sa prison, mais lorsqu’on lui dit que son mari la traite publiquement de « dinde, de péquenaude et de rustre… immonde et boiteuse », elle est suffisamment piquée dans son amour-propre pour vouloir se venger.

Le comte revient avant qu’ils n’aient pu se rendre à la cour. Francesca se voile rapidement le visage pour ne pas être reconnue et le duc la présente comme sa cousine la baronne de Linsberg, veuve arrivée d’Angleterre. Bien que son apparence et sa voix éveillent les soupçons du comte, il n’a pour seul espoir que de pouvoir s’assurer de sa véritable identité une fois à la cour, vers laquelle ils se dirigent ensemble.

Scène 2. A l’intérieur des appartements royaux du Louvre, les courtisans essaient de tirer des renseignements du page concernant la mystérieuse nouvelle-arrivée, mais Edmondo élude leurs questions en déclarant seulement que le roi a l’intention de s’amuser. Il est aussi interrogé par le comte qui, frustré de n’avoir pu voir le visage de la jeune femme, se doute de plus en plus qu’il s’agit en fait de son épouse.

Le roi dit à Edmondo de faire savoir à la dame qu’il souhaite faire sa connaissance et l’accompagner à un tournoi sur le point de commencer. Lorsqu’elle fait son entrée, le roi et le comte essaient l’un et l’autre désespérément, pour différentes raisons, de découvrir son visage. La scène est d’une intensité dramatique – et d’un comique – absolument extraordinaire. Le roi se délecte à présenter Francesca, avec une courtoisie exagérée, au comte. Elle profite de la situation pour dire au comte combien elle compatit d’apprendre que sa femme « accablée par l’âge … est bien mal lotie », et s’enquiert aimablement de la santé de celle-ci. Le comte, quant à lui, est à l’agonie : il reconnaît bien sa femme mais, après tout ce qu’il a dit d’elle, se trouve dans l’incapacité de la réclamer.

Une trompette annonce le début du tournoi. Le roi prie la comtesse de bien vouloir remettre son épée au vainqueur. De son côté, elle cherche à apaiser son époux – ou peut-être à le provoquer davantage – en l’exhortant à participer au tournoi et à faire ses preuves « dans le champ ». Il ne peut que regretter que son âge avancé l’empêche de répondre à ses vœux. Tout le monde quitte la scène sauf le duc, qui s’attarde un instant pour avouer que s’il avait la bonne fortune d’avoir une telle femme, il se montrerait sans doute aussi jaloux que le comte.

Scène 3. Le terrain proche du Louvre où le tournoi vient de s’achever. Toute la cour s’extasie sur le charme et la beauté de Francesca. Cependant, Edmondo continue de tourmenter le malheureux comte, qui est au martyre : n’ayant plus aucun doute sur l’identité de Francesca, il se demande s’il réussira jamais à récupérer sa femme.

Francesca s’enquiert de l’identité du chevalier inconnu qui a remporté le tournoi : il s’avère qu’il s’agit du roi en personne. Elle lui passe l’épée du vainqueur à la ceinture et, en retour, il exprime le vœu de la voir épouser un homme qui l’admire depuis longtemps : le duc. Elle consent, mais seulement à condition qu’il ne fasse pas preuve à son endroit de la même jalousie que feu son premier mari. Alors que le roi leur donne sa bénédiction et s’apprête à les prononcer mari et femme, le comte incapable de se retenir plus longtemps déclare en protestant que Francesca est son épouse. Obligé de s’humilier en public, il avoue que tout ce qu’il a dit d’elle était faux.

Le page explique le mystère de la chevalière, et l’opéra s’achève sur une note réjouissante et l’espoir que le comte aura compris la leçon et manifestera à l’avenir plus de respect pour le beau sexe, moins de jalousie et plus de douceur.

Inserts